Press Coverage

Death on the road: Traffic accidents kill more than malaria, HIV and TB

Road traffic accidents have become the eighth leading cause of death worldwide killing 1.35 million people a year, a report from the World Health Organization (WHO) has revealed. The “unacceptably high” death toll is higher than that from malaria, HIV or tuberculosis and is climbing – global road traffic deaths stood at 1.15 million in 2000. Children and young adults are most at risk, with more than 440,000 aged between five and 29 killed on the roads in 2016.

“Road safety is an issue that does not receive anywhere near the attention it deserves,” said Michael Bloomberg, CEO of Bloomberg Philanthropies and the WHO’s global ambassador for noncommunicable diseases and injuries.

Bloomberg Philanthropies will donate $50 million to battle opioid epidemic

Bloomberg Philanthropies will donate $50 million to states fighting the opioid epidemic, an effort to support current programs and encourage new approaches. Former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg announced the three-year program Friday morning during the second day of a health conference in Washington hosted by another of his ventures, the Bloomberg American Health Initiative.

These nine cities are dreaming up local solutions to global issues

The Bloomberg Philanthropies Mayors Challenge worked with city leaders to launch innovative projects to address complex issues like homelessness and energy independence.

Parkland, Coral Springs win $1 million grant for art projects on gun violence, healing

The award comes from Bloomberg Philanthropies, the nonprofit started by former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who also founded the gun-control organization Everytown for Gun Safety. The first of the public artworks could be unveiled as soon as Feb. 14, the first anniversary of the massacre that claimed 17 lives, says Julia Andrews, director of the Coral Springs Museum of Art.

Bloomberg gives Johns Hopkins a record $1.8 billion for student financial aid

Former New York mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced Sunday he is giving a record $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to support student financial aid at his alma mater and make its admissions process “forever need-blind.” The gift, believed to be the largest private donation in modern times to higher education, is a landmark in a growing national movement to make elite universities more accessible to students from low- to middle-income families.

The $185 million quest to make people love the ocean enough to protect it

Our oceans are under threat–now Bloomberg Philanthropies and OceanX are trying to make it clear how much will be lost if we don’t fix the problem.

Can Alaska Help Solve Climate Change?

Bloomberg Philanthropies has chosen Anchorage, Alaska, as a 2018 Public Art Challenge, and the city will now get up to $1 million for a project aimed at finding solutions to climate change.

Mayors Challenge Winners Target Justice, Homeless, Energy

The idea for a juvenile justice hub started with a handful of Philadelphia police officers who knew the way they interacted with juveniles had to change. The judges of the Bloomberg Philanthropies U.S. Mayors Challenge are willing to bet their idea will work.

Bloomberg announced the nine winners of the challenge that tasked cities to develop innovative solutions to their biggest problems that other cities might copy if they are successful. Each winner will receive $1 million in prize money to implement the ideas.

World’s top fishing nations to be given millions to protect oceans

Millions of pounds’ worth of funding to tackle global overfishing and protect coral reefs will be announced at a major conference in Indonesia. Politicians, marine experts and philanthropists will convene in Bali at the Our Ocean conference to agree commitments on how to address the pressures facing our oceans, including rising sea temperatures, unsustainable fishing practices, marine pollution and coral bleaching. Bloomberg Philanthropies will announce a cash injection of $86m [£67m] to support coastal communities across 10 countries, including Australia, Fiji, Indonesia, Tanzania, Peru and the US.

The talent is out there. So why don’t elite colleges enroll more low-income students?

We worked with Bloomberg Philanthropies and a group of high-graduation-rate colleges — now numbering more than 100 — to form the American Talent Initiative (ATI). ATI is based on the belief that colleges can achieve more by working together — making shared commitments to prioritize socioeconomic diversity, holding one another accountable, and sharing strategies that work — than by going it alone. Unlike previous attempts to address this challenge, we’ve set a concrete goal: enroll and graduate 50,000 additional low- and middle-income students per year at high-graduation-rate colleges and universities by 2025.