Road Safety

HELPING TO SAVE LIVES THROUGH PROVEN INTERVENTIONS THAT REDUCE ROAD TRAFFIC FATALITIES

Nearly 85% of the world’s countries lack adequate laws to counter the growing rates of traffic deaths and injuries. As a result, an estimated 1.24 million deaths and 20-50 million injuries occur every year, with 90% of these fatalities occurring in low- and middle-income countries.

Without action, road traffic crashes will become the seventh leading cause of death by 2030. That’s why the Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety has dedicated $250 million over 12 years to implement interventions that have been proven to reduce road traffic fatalities and injuries in low- and middle-income countries. In 2015 we began implementing evidence-based interventions in our global network of ten cities, strengthening road safety legislation in five targeted countries, and crash testing new vehicles in three world regions.

APPLYING THE BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES APPROACH TO GLOBAL ROAD SAFETY

  1. PARTNERSHIPS

    The Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety works with the world’s leading road safety organizations to implement road safety activities and coordinate with in-country governmental and non-governmental stakeholders.

  2. DATA AND EVALUATION

    We place an emphasis on achieving outcomes, and on using high-quality monitoring and evaluation mechanisms to continually assess our program’s progress.

  3. LOCAL ACTIONS

    The Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety reflects Bloomberg Philanthropies’ vision that progress can be achieved both locally and nationally. Implementation of programs at the local level complements national policy progress.

Road Safety – Fortaleza

URBAN DESIGN INTERVENTIONS TURN FORTALEZA INTO A MORE LIVABLE CITY FOR PEDESTRIANS AND CYCLISTS

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SAVING LIVES AND REDUCING INJURIES BY IMPROVING ROAD SAFETY POLICY AND PRACTICE

Many of the world’s roads lack important safety regulations that could help prevent traffic injuries and deaths. To fill this void, The Bloomberg Philanthropies Initiative for Global Road Safety focuses on improving road safety laws in 5 countries and on and implementing evidence-based interventions in 10 cities.

From 2007 to 2009, Bloomberg Philanthropies funded a pilot program in Cambodia, Mexico, and Vietnam to see if proven road safety interventions could be adapted and used on a global scale. This effort was expanded in 2010 to support the implementation of these interventions and successfully reduce road traffic fatalities and injuries in ten low- and middle- countries that account for half of the global road crash fatalities –  Brazil, Cambodia, China, Egypt, India, Kenya, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, and Vietnam.

In 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies launched phase two of the Initiative for Global Road Safety which will address road traffic safety in ten cities (Accra, Addis Ababa, Bandung, Bangkok, Bogota, Fortaleza, Ho Chi Minh City, Mumbai, Sao Paulo, and Shanghai), five countries (China, India, Philippines, Tanzania, and Thailand), and three vehicle market regions (Latin America, India, and Southeast Asia) with the primary goal of reducing road traffic fatalities and injuries.

 

WE FOCUS ON FIVE PROVEN INTERVENTIONS

 

  1. BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS

    Motorcycle helmets are a proven way to decrease deaths and disabilities. Helmet usage decreases the risk of injuries by 69% and deaths by 42%.

    The simple act of buckling a seat-belt is one of the most-effective ways to save lives. Seat-belt use reduces serious and fatal injuries by 40% to 65%.

    Drinking and driving can put everyone on the road in danger. Drinking and driving increases both the risk of a crash and the likelihood that a death or a serious injury will occur.

    An increase in average speed is directly related to the likelihood of a crash occurring and to the severity of its consequences. A pedestrian struck by a car going 40 mph has a 70% chance of dying, while a pedestrian struck by a car going 30 mph has a 20% chance of dying – or an 80% chance of surviving.

  2. INFRASTRUCTURE

    Road Safety improvements such as shoulder widening, installation of a median or barrier, controlled crosswalks, lane marking and separation, intersection improvement, and other measures reduce the risk of road traffic fatalities and injuries for all road users, including car occupants, motorcyclists, bicyclists, and pedestrians by 25% to 40%.

  3. SUSTAINABLE URBAN TRANSPORT

    Roads are made safer by reducing car travel and designing secure modes of transit, including mass transportation systems, walking infrastructure, and bike routes. One example of mass transport is the bus rapid transit system, which can reduce fatalities and crashes by 40% to 50%.

  4. VEHICLE STANDARDS

    Many low- and middle-income countries have little or no regulatory standards for vehicles. For example, in the United States all cars must have seat-belts and airbags, which together reduce the risk of death by 61%. But in many countries where we work, car manufacturers are not required to install seat-belts or airbags, leaving the passengers at higher risk for death and injury.

  5. POLICY STRENGTHENING

    The World Health Organization works with the Ministry of Health in 5 countries to review national road safety legislation and propose recommendations for strengthening it, such as mandating that all vehicle occupants wear a seat-belt or age appropriate child restraint. Additionally, the Global Road Safety Partnership manages a grants program that enables civil society organizations in eligible cities and countries to apply for funding and advocate for evidence-based road safety policies.

Road Safety – India

GOOD SAMARITAN LAW SAVES LIVES

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MOMENTUM IS BUILDING TO REDUCE ROAD TRAFFIC FATALITIES AND INJURIES

Since 2007, several countries have been successful in implementing road safety interventions and reducing traffic injury and death rates.

One key milestone is the development of the Global Status Report on Road Safety, which is the first comprehensive assessment of road safety and draws data from 180 different countries. We have also worked with our partners and local governments to train more than 36,000 professionals in ten target countries to help increase implementation of road safety measures. Through the collaborative effort of our partners and the Global Health Advocacy Incubator, 8 countries or localities have passed new or improved road safety laws, protecting 1.95 billion people.

 

TEN CRITICAL VICTORIES FOR GLOBAL ROAD SAFETY:

  1. Through Bloomberg-supported road safety efforts approximately 125,000 lives will be saved from strengthened legislation, improved infrastructure and safer sustainable urban transportation as well as increased seat-belt and helmet use, and reduced drinking and speeding.
  2. ACCRA, GHANA
    Reactivated lights on one of the major highways, following an assessment by the International Road Assessment Program and WRI inspections.
  3. ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
    Established an inter-agency road safety council chaired by Deputy Mayor. Assessed high-risk road throughout the cities, and recommendations made to the city; awaiting city approval to implement recommendations.
  4. BANDUNG, INDONESIA
    Aired helmet campaign together with increased enforcement.
  5. BANGKOK, THAILAND

    Aired hard-hitting drinking and driving media campaign followed by increased police enforcement.

  6. BOGOTA, COLOMBIA

    Drinking and driving enforcement program ready with Standard Operating Procedures and equipment breathalyzers procured; media campaign already aired, and will likely re-air to correspond with DD enforcement.

  7. FORTALEZA, BRAZIL

    Inaugurated its first slow-speed zone (Area de Transito Calmo) in the Rodolfo Teofilo neighborhood. On Saturday 11th June, the new Zone 30 was opened to the public with the following interventions:

    -3 raised pedestrian crossings
    -Speed reduced to 30 km/h
    -14 curb extensions
    -1 electronic radar

  8. HO CHI MINH CITY, VIETNAM

    The Safer Streets and Safer Mobility Team anticipates that the final detailed design of the BRT line will be ready by July or August. At this time, another iRAP desk review and star rating is planned to demonstrate the improvement from the existing conditions through the various stages of design.

  9. MUMBAI, INDIA

    Partners held meetings with the MCGM Chief Engineer, Mr. Manhohar Pawar and the Municipal Commissioner, Mr. Ajoy Mehta to discuss progress and implementation of recommendations on the LBS Road. The first phase of implementation is 4.5 km; partners will also be inspecting 4-5 major black spots in the city and providing design recommendations.

  10. SAO PAULO, BRAZIL

    Provide technical support to the redesigning of the Sao Miguel neighborhood and start a community engagement plan in Sao Miguel Paulista.