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Vibrant Oceans Q&A: Fighting illegal fishing through Global Fishing Watch

The global losses due to illegal fishing and overfishing cost the world’s economy up to $23.5 billion annually. Vessels are getting away with these harmful practices by failing to report where they are fishing and what they are catching. They’re fishing in protected waters and depleting the fisheries of certain species, diminishing populations to irreparable […]

50 Reefs Q&A: Believing in the capacity of humans to self-correct

Dr. Ameer Abdulla, Senior Marine Advisor, World Commission of Protected Areas, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

What are some of the challenges you’ve encountered as you work to protect reefs in the Maldives?

I believe there is a general lack of recognition of the critical role coral reefs play in the persistence of the islands and the economy of the country. Of course this issue is not unique to Maldives but is especially emphasized given the geography and geomorphology of the country. The wellbeing of not just the coral reefs but also the people is at stake when reefs are not managed as well as they could be.

50 Reefs Q&A: Prevention is better than a cure

Dr. Sangeeta Mangubhai, Fiji Country Director, Wildlife Conservation Society

Can you tell us about the problems that are affecting coral reefs globally?

Coral reefs are facing an onslaught of stresses and pressures from land-based pollution, destructive fishing, overfishing, and climate change. Any one of these human caused stresses have the potential to impact coral reefs. Together they are causing wide scale losses and declines in coral reefs all over the world at alarming rates. Even some of the more remote parts of the world, away from human habitation, coral reefs are impacted by climate change-induced thermal events that can cause coral bleaching.

50 Reefs Q&A: Raising awareness on the importance of coral reef conservation in Indonesia

With Rili Djohani, the Executive Director of Coral Triangle Center

Can you tell us about the problems that are affecting coral reefs globally?
More than 60 percent of the world’s reefs are under immediate and direct threat from local sources such as overfishing, destructive fishing, uncontrolled coastal development, watershed-based pollution, or marine-based pollution and direct physical damage from coral mining and tourism activities such as trampling on the reef. An estimated 75 percent of the world’s coral reefs are rated as threatened when local threats are combined with global threats such as thermal stress caused by climate change and ocean acidification. If local and global threats are not addressed, the percentage of threatened reefs is projected to increase to 90 percent by 2050.

Follow the Data Podcast Episode 8: Plenty of Fish in the Sea?

One of the largest single contributions ever made for such work, the Vibrant Oceans Initiative focuses on revitalizing the fish population by simultaneously tackling both industrial and local fishing practices.

In this episode, we’ll go in depth on the ways the Vibrant Oceans Initiative is working to encourage responsible fishing globally to protect this vital source of food and income for generations to come.

Leading the conversation is Andrew Sharpless, the Chief Executive Officer of our partner organization Oceana, and Melissa Wright from the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Environment team.

Photo Tour of the 2016 C40 Award Winners

By Kelly Shultz, Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Environment Team

Last week the Bloomberg Philanthropies Environment Team joined global C40 mayors, policy experts, city officials and business leaders in Mexico City for the sixth C40 Mayors Summit. Together we explored how to accelerate climate action in 90 of the world’s greatest and largest cities—from Austin to Rio de Janeiro to Oslo to Wuhan—and celebrated the boldest urban climate projects from 2016 at the C40 Awards Ceremony.

10 more U.S. mayors join City Energy Project and commit to reduce building emissions

By Kelly Shultz, Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Environment team

Now more than ever, cities are taking the lead when it comes to acting on climate change. Last May, Melissa Wright took to our blog to tell the story of the City Energy Project, a nationwide initiative co-funded by Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Kresge Foundation, and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation to address the largest source of pollution and energy use in cities, namely buildings.

Our Cities, Our Climate Exchange Advances Local Climate Action

Cities around the world are facing unique challenges as they confront the realities of climate change, yet their motivations for building low-carbon sustainable futures are the same. The way in which locals leaders take action on bold climate measures is an opportunity for cities to learn from one another. That’s why the U.S. Department of State and Bloomberg Philanthropies convened the second Our Cities, Our Climate exchange this year, hosting 17 urban sustainability directors from 16 countries to participate in collaborative sessions in three U.S. cities: San Francisco, California; Austin, Texas; and Washington, D.C.

On Financing Fish

By Dale Galvin, Managing Director of Sustainable Markets and Finance, Rare

Many years ago I visited Ligui, a small town on the east coast of Baja California, Mexico.  We were engaging the local fishing community with our time-tested approach to making change.  It included equal parts community engagement, social marketing, capacity building, and the provision of technical assistance which, in this case, ensured the fishing cooperatives could achieve legal status and begin to manage their fisheries sustainably.

Oceana and Bloomberg Philanthropies: Working Together for Vibrant Oceans

By Andy Sharpless, Oceana CEO

In January 2014, Bloomberg Philanthropies launched its Vibrant Oceans Initiative, a five-year, $53 million commitment to help restore fish populations around the world. The grant, which supports work by Oceana, Rare and Encourage Capital, marked the largest philanthropic commitment to international fisheries reform management to date.