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Results for "american cities" returned 178 items.

American Cities Drive Fleet Electrification Efforts Across United States

By Electrification Coalition

In recent years, the transportation sector has become the leading source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the U.S., accounting for approximately 29 percent of total annual emissions. [1]  Additionally, the transportation system is a major contributor to increased air pollution that negatively impacts our health – and, with the volitale nature of our oil markets, oil’s monopoly on our transportation sector also threatens our economy. The problem is clear: a gas-guzzling transportation sector presents risks to our economy, public health, and environment.

Bloomberg Philanthropies Announces the American Cities Best at Using Data to Improve Residents’ Lives in 2019

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced the seven cities to achieve 2019 What Works Cities Certification, a national standard of excellence in city governance. What Works Cities Certification rates how well cities are managed by measuring the extent to which city leaders incorporate data and evidence in their decision-making. This year, the Certification recognizes Arlington, TX; Kansas City, MO; Louisville, KY; Memphis, TN; Philadelphia, PA; Scottsdale, AZ; and Washington, DC.

From Plans to Progress: Catalyzing Climate Action through the American Cities Climate Challenge

By Kelly Shultz and Anne Emig of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Environment and Government Innovation teams

Last week, the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge brought together more than 100 of the country’s foremost city sustainability leaders for a three-day convening in Austin. Participants represented a robust network of world-class partners, dedicated city officials, and leading policy experts who all share one common goal: fight climate change on a local level to create healthier, more resilient, and more sustainable communities for city residents.

Mike Bloomberg Announces Potential Impact of the Bloomberg Philanthropies American Cities Climate Challenge

Joining Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) General Manager and CEO Clint Bullock at the OUC Gardenia campus, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg announced that the potential impact of programs pursued in the Bloomberg Philanthropies American Cities Climate Challenge are projected to eliminate 40 million metric tons of carbon emissions by 2025—comparable to shuttering 10 coal plants or taking 8.5 million cars off the road for one year. Climate action will also improve lives for millions of citizens around the country, through advancements in public transit, cleaner air, and cheaper energy bills.

New report: What American cities learned from last year’s Mayors Challenge

By James Anderson, head of the Government Innovation program at Bloomberg Philanthropies

American cities are in a unique and powerful position to uncover innovative, scalable, and impactful solutions to today’s biggest concerns—including everything from homelessness and opioid addiction to climate change and mobility. And that’s why, after successful runs in the United States, Europe, and Latin America & the Caribbean, Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge returned to the U.S. last year: to empower the kind of optimistic and entrepreneurial problem-solving city leaders are ready to deliver.

Mike Bloomberg Names Albuquerque, Austin, Denver, Orlando and San Antonio as Winners in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg joined Austin Mayor Steve Adler and San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg in Austin and San Antonio, respectively, to announce Albuquerque, Austin, Denver, Orlando and San Antonio as the final winners in Bloomberg’s American Cities Climate Challenge. These five cities complete the twenty-five total winning cities in the challenge, joining the twenty others previously announced: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Honolulu, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, Saint Paul, San Diego, San Jose, Seattle, St. Louis, St. Petersburg, and Washington, D.C.

Mike Bloomberg Announces Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge Expands From 20 To 25 Cities, Names St. Petersburg 20th Winner

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg joined St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman to announce St. Petersburg as the twentieth winning city in Bloomberg’s American Cities Climate Challenge. Bloomberg also announced the expansion of the program’s total winning cities from 20 to 25, citing the strength of city applications to the program. The program will now work with 25 cities to accelerate their ambitious efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for residents. St. Petersburg joins nineteen other winners announced last year: Atlanta, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Honolulu, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, Saint Paul, San Diego, San Jose, Seattle, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C.

Mike Bloomberg Names Charlotte as Winner in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg joined Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles at the UNC Charlotte Center City Garden to announce Charlotte as the nineteenth winning city in Bloomberg’s American Cities Climate Challenge. Charlotte joins eighteen other winners announced this year: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Honolulu, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, Saint Paul, San Diego, San Jose, Seattle, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C.

Michael R. Bloomberg Names Honolulu as a Winner in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg joined Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell to announce Honolulu as the next winning city in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ American Cities Climate Challenge. Honolulu joins the previously announced winners – Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, San Diego, San Jose, Saint Paul, Seattle, St. Louis, and Washington, D.C. – as the 18th of 20 winning cities of the Climate Challenge.

Michael R. Bloomberg Names Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Indianapolis and St. Louis as Winners in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

Next to the Mill City Museum, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg joined Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and Saint Paul Mayor Melvin Carter to announce Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Chicago, Cincinnati, Columbus, Indianapolis, and St. Louis as the next round of winning cities in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ American Cities Climate Challenge. These seven cities are the next round of cities to join ten previously announced winners – Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Portland, San Diego, San Jose, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. – as 17 of the total 20 cities to be named winners of the Climate Challenge.

Mike Bloomberg Names Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston and Washington, DC as Winners in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto in West End Overlook Park to announce Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Boston, and Washington D.C. as the next round of winning cities for the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. These four cities join six other cities – Atlanta, Los Angeles, Portland, San Diego, San Jose and Seattle – as the first half of the total twenty cities that will be named winners of the Climate Challenge. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is a $70 million-dollar program that will accelerate these 20 cities’ efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for residents.

Mike Bloomberg Names Los Angeles, Portland, San Diego, and San Jose as Winners in Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge

UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) President Rhea Suh at the Griffith Park Observatory to announce California cities Los Angeles, San Diego and San Jose as well as Portland, Oregon as the next round of winning cities for the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. These four cities join Seattle and Atlanta, which Bloomberg announced last month. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is a $70 million-dollar program that will accelerate 20 cities’ efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for residents.

Mike Bloomberg Names Seattle and Atlanta First Winners in American Cities Climate Challenge

Today, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action and former New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg joined Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan in Seattle’s Kerry Park to announce Seattle and Atlanta as the first round of winning cities for the Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge. The Bloomberg American Cities Climate Challenge is a $70 million dollar program that will accelerate 20 ambitious cities’ efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for residents. Through the Climate Challenge – which is part of Bloomberg’s American Cities Initiative, a suite of more than $200 million in investments to strengthen city halls and advance critical policies – Seattle and Atlanta are accepted into a two-year acceleration program, will be provided powerful new resources and access to cutting-edge support to help meet or beat the cities’ near-term carbon reduction goals.

How to Win the American Cities Climate Challenge

By Antha Williams and James Anderson

Last week, Bloomberg Philanthropies announced a $70-million Challenge aimed at helping cities across America grow their economies and protect human health by taking action to fight climate change. Mike Bloomberg will be emailing the mayors of the 100 largest U.S. cities about it — so keep an eye on your inbox, or tell your mayor to!

Here’s what it’s all about: When it comes to climate change, cities are both the problem and the solution. Globally, they’re the source of 70 percent of the emissions that are leading to climate change. But they’re also where creative solutions, combined with bold leadership from mayors, can make a real difference.

Bloomberg Philanthropies Announces the American Cities Climate Challenge to Support Mayors Tackling Climate Change in the United States

Michael R. Bloomberg, the United Nations Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Climate Action and co-chair of America’s Pledge, announced the $70 million American Cities Climate Challenge, a major new effort to expedite progress in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while growing local economies during a time of inaction from the federal government. Through a competitive process, Bloomberg Philanthropies will select the 20 mayors demonstrating the strongest leadership and commitment to move America forward on delivering the goals of the Paris Agreement – a 26% reduction in emissions from 2005 levels. Selected cities will participate in a two-year program designed to significantly deepen the impact of their efforts to tackle climate change. The $70 million investment includes funding from a philanthropic partner and additional charitable partners may join the effort in the future.

American Cities Climate Challenge

The American Cities Climate Challenge is an unprecedented opportunity for 25 ambitious cities to significantly deepen and accelerate their efforts to tackle climate change and promote a sustainable future for their residents. Originally open to 20 American cities, the program was expanded to 25 cities due to the strength of the applications received.

Nine American cities are revolutionizing how data can improve lives

Bloomberg Philanthropies named the inaugural group of nine US cities to achieve What Works Cities certification, its standard for government effectiveness. Underpinning the certification is an evaluation of how well a city uses data-driven decisions to improve its residents’ lives.

Bloomberg Philanthropies Announces the American Cities Best at Using Data to Improve Residents’ Lives

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced the inaugural group of nine cities to achieve What Works Cities Certification, a first-of-its-kind national standard of excellence in city governance. What Works Cities Certification rates how well cities are managed by measuring the extent to which city leaders incorporate data and evidence in their decision-making. The certification recognizes Boston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Louisville, New Orleans, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle and Washington, D.C for their proven leadership in data-driven government. Through What Works Cities, the nine cities will each receive additional expert assistance to accelerate progress and deepen their leadership in using data.

American Cities Initiative

The American Cities Initiative is an expansion of Mike Bloomberg’s support for U.S. cities at a time when they face steep challenges, and when the nation needs them to power solutions that move the country forward. The initiative will help city leaders address climate change, combat obesity and gun violence, and catalyze new opportunities for […]

Michael R. Bloomberg Announces $200 Million American Cities Initiative to Help U.S. Cities Innovate, Solve Problems, and Work Together in New Ways

In an address at the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ Annual Meeting in Miami, Michael R. Bloomberg announced the American Cities Initiative, a suite of new and expanded investments that will empower cities to generate innovation and advance policy that moves the nation forward.

Who’s Empowering Wonks to Fuel Economic Growth in American Cities?

Bloomberg Philanthropies made our list of most interesting foundations in 2014 because of its wide range of huge gifts, signaling ways the foundation may be forging new giving paths in Michael Bloomberg’s first year outside of the mayor’s office. But there’s one interesting initiative at BP we’ve haven’t talked about much that’s been getting big funding and spreading to new areas: Bloomberg’s Innovation Teams.

This initiative is mainly associated with Mike Bloomberg’s wonky obsession with making government more efficient. But it also offers insights into how one of America’s top funders aims to foster economic growth and job creation in U.S. cities, a challenge which has confounded many foundations and yet is attracting new energy amid a growing focus on urban renewal.

Bloomberg Philanthropies Expands Innovation Teams Program to 12 New American Cities

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced that 12 U.S. cities have been selected to participate in the $45 million expansion of its Innovation Teams program. The program aims to improve the capacity of City Halls to effectively design and implement new approaches that improve citizens’ lives – relying on data, open innovation, and strong project and performance management to help mayors address pressing urban challenges.

Bloomberg Philanthropies Launches Mayors Challenge: Competition for American Cities to Solve Problems, Share Solutions

Michael R. Bloomberg today announced Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Mayors Challenge, a competition to inspire American cities to generate innovative ideas that solve major challenges and improve city life. The Mayors Challenge will award one $5 million grand prize and four $1 million prizes to the cities that come up with the boldest and most replicable ideas.

Twenty Cities Advance in Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Latin American and Caribbean Mayors Challenge

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced the 20 Latin American and Caribbean cities selected as finalists in its 2016 Mayors Challenge, a competition that encourages cities to generate bold ideas that solve urban challenges and improve city life – and have potential to spread.  The finalists, hailing from 10 countries, will move forward to compete for a 5 million USD grand prize and four 1 million USD awards, as well as extensive implementation support. The ideas reflect creative new approaches to some of the most pressing issues facing cities in the region, including mobility, youth unemployment, waste management, obesity, and social and economic inclusion for immigrants and people with disabilities.

363 Latin American and Caribbean Cities Enter Bloomberg Philanthropies’ 2016 Mayors Challenge

Bloomberg Philanthropies announced that 363 cities across Latin America and the Caribbean have entered the 2016 Mayors Challenge. These 363 cities represent 40 percent of all eligible cities in the region – topping the 30 and 28 percent participation rates experienced in the United States and European Mayors Challenge, respectively.

The 2016 Mayors Challenge will award a $5 million USD grand prize and four $1 million awards to four other cities that generate powerful ideas. Participating mayors must submit a bold idea that addresses a serious problem, improves customer service for residents, creates significant government efficiencies, and/or increases public engagement.

17 Mayors From Across The Country Launch Cities Of Service To Mobilize Millions More Americans In A New Era Of Service

Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg today was joined by mayors from 16 cities across the country to launch Cities of Service, a bipartisan coalition of mayors representing more than 20 million Americans, who will work together to engage millions more volunteers in service. The founding mayors met for a half-day summit at Gracie Mansion where they signed a Declaration of Service, a commitment to finding new ways to tap the power of volunteers to address each city’s most pressing challenges. The coalition will share strategies on how best to engage citizens at the local level, and it will provide a platform for the mayors to make their voices heard – and their priorities known – in Washington. The coalition will utilize lead support from the Rockefeller Foundation to provide technical assistance and other support to member mayors, including funding full-time Chief Service Officers in select cities to develop and implement comprehensive service programs.

Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ballmer Group Announce Ten U.S. Cities to Join New Initiative to Increase Economic Mobility

Bloomberg Philanthropies, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ballmer Group announced the ten American cities that will participate in a new national initiative to identify, pilot, and measure the success of interventions to accelerate economic mobility for their residents. The U.S. cities embarking on this project are: Albuquerque, NM; Cincinnati, OH; Dayton, OH; Detroit, MI; Lansing, MI; New Orleans, LA; Newark, NJ; Racine, WI; Rochester, NY; and Tulsa, OK.

After New York City’s New Congestion Pricing Plan, Will Other U.S. Cities Follow Suit?

By Antha N. Williams of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Environment team

New York City has sparked debate across the country over its decision to use congestion pricing to accelerate and help fund the adoption of low-carbon transportation. Now, several other cities in the U.S., including DC, Honolulu, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland, and Seattle, are starting to explore the potential for this bold action to advance their own climate and livability efforts.

Follow the Data Podcast: American Talent Initiative, A Progress Report

As members of the American Talent Initiative (ATI) convene this week, we are re-running an episode featuring a conversation between Dan Porterfield, ATI Steering Committee member, and Howard Wolfson, head of the education program here at Bloomberg Philanthropies. At the time this episode was recorded, Dan Porterfield was the president of Franklin & Marshall College; he is now the president and CEO of the Aspen Institute.

Building city hall capacity to fight climate change: 6 takeaways from U.S. cities

This year, we’ve been able to get an inside look at an important question: How ready are American cities to fight climate change? The answer is important to the future of our planet. Globally, cities are the source of 70 percent of all greenhouse-gas emissions, particularly via the cars urban dwellers drive and the energy required to heat and cool their buildings. U.S. cities are responsible for a disproportionate share of the total.

Our inside look came through the Bloomberg Philanthropies American Cities Climate Challenge. It’s a $70 million effort aimed at accelerating work already happening on the ground in U.S. cities to reduce carbon pollution. More than 50 cities applied, and as co-leaders of the initiative, we visited almost 40 of them.